Categories

Google Tweets Article on How Google Analytics Can Help With Crowdfunding

Is it possible you can use data to discover more about those who’ll donate to your cause? Yes, it is.

You have a great idea, message, or prototype that you want to release to the world. You just know, with every fibre of your being, that if your baby were just given a chance, it could make great waves. 

But you know that your vision needs funding, and you’ve turned to crowdfunding as an avenue to help to not only share your vision, but also plant a seed of desire in the minds and hearts of others. 

Some see your crowdfunding campaign, think your idea is great, and leave.

Others feel the same way, and consider donating.

And then, there are those that do.

Here’s the question: Is there something different about those that do?

Now, before I get into this, I want to say that there are many reasons why someone may choose to fund your vision, and some of those reasons may not be objectively measurable. 

I say that because I don’t want to be superficial and assume that the art and science of persuasion can be boiled down to a few data points and numbers. I don’t wish to mislead anyone into thinking that if there’s a correlation between those who donate and a certain demographic, that that correlation is necessarily what causes people to donate. (There’s a saying that correlation doesn’t equal causation.)

Anyway, enough of that.

Recently, on the Google Analytics Twitter channel, there was a tweet to an article on ifundwomen.com (IFW). This article, titled Raise more money crowdfunding with Google Analytics, first invites the reader to consider crowdfunding. 

It then brings up an interesting point: crowdfunding marketing strategy. I’ll elaborate on that later.

Then, it mentions that by using tracking (via Google Analytics and Facebook tracking IDs), one can find out more about those who donate. (That said, the article talks more about Google Analytics than Facebook’s tracking ID.)

It’s worth mentioning here that in order to use a tracking code on your crowdfunding campaign, your crowdfunding platform has to allow you to add tracking codes to your campaign page. 

Just a note: while I think you can find out more about those who donate, I don’t think Analytics will give you personally-identifiable information about those who donate. That is, Analytics won’t say, “so-and-so donated,” as that would probably be a breach of privacy. 

A Few Thoughts on How You Can Use Google Analytics (as Well as Other Tracking Platforms) to Maximize the Reach and Success of Your Campaign

First, let’s go back to what I wanted to elaborate on: the idea of a crowdfunding marketing strategy. 

If you think of your efforts from this perspective–that you want to attract the best people to your campaign, have them fall in love with your idea, and then persuade them, you have the right perspective. 

To begin with, make sure your crowdfunding page is as attractive as possible. You want to really “Wow!” your visitors. 

Then, as the article says, you want to have tracking on your campaign.

Over time, your tracking platform will build up data. Look to see if you can find any interesting correlations.

I’d say you can also use free and paid advertising methods to bring traffic to your campaign. I know that your budget may be tight, so start with the free methods. 

You can use your data to find out which demographics, which age groups, etc. are most likely to spend time considering your vision. 

Then, if you’re confident, you can use paid advertising. 

In summary, using a tracking platform such as Google Analytics can help give you some insight into your crowdfunding donors. It can be a powerful tool for scaling up your efforts. 

Source: Google Analytics Twitter channel